pork, bacon

English translation: ... bacon / salt ...

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:pork, bacon (other animals)
Selected answer:... bacon / salt ...
Entered by: Tony M

09:52 Sep 9, 2016
English language (monolingual) [PRO]
Science - Food & Drink / meats, fats
English term or phrase: pork, bacon
I wonder if we have a word in English for "pork" of other animals like moose, elk, deer etc.
Speck in German and spek in Scandinavian languages.
What word covers those parts in other animals than pig?
jeffrey engberg
Norway
Local time: 22:45
... bacon
Explanation:
It is quite common nowadays to use the terms 'bacon' and 'ham' to refer to the same kind of meats prepared from different animals; I really don't see any problem with using it here, even if it does lead to some terms that sound unwieldy simply because they are unfamiliar.
Selected response from:

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:45
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



SUMMARY OF ALL EXPLANATIONS PROVIDED
3 +3... bacon
Tony M
2 +3preserved/cured + name of animal (meat)
Helena Chavarria
4venison
Yvonne Gallagher
3pemmican
Charles Davis
2 -1lard
Agneta Pallinder
Summary of reference entries provided
Ref.
Lingua 5B

Discussion entries: 34





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
pemmican


Explanation:
I think that in practice this may be what you want. Amundsen certainly had it.

"Pemmican is a concentrated mixture of fat and protein used as a nutritious food. It is part of Canadian cuisine. [...] It was widely adopted as a high-energy food by Europeans involved in the fur trade and later by Arctic and Antarctic explorers, such as Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton, Fridtjof Nansen, Robert Falcon Scott and Roald Amundsen.
The specific ingredients used were usually whatever was available; the meat was often bison, deer, elk, or moose."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

Alternatively, I think you could just use "speck". I don't feel that "venison" is suitable, however qualified.

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Note added at 1 hr (2016-09-09 11:11:46 GMT)
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Bacon, unqualified, always means from pigs. Qualified (elk bacon, moose bacon, etc.) it sounds odd to me. And of course you have the problem that several different kinds of animal are involved, so you're going to end up with a cumbersome translation like that.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 22:45
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  B D Finch: According to this recipe, it's not quite "speck": http://www.offthegridnews.com/how-to-2/how-to-make-pemmican-...
42 mins
  -> No, it isn't. And the asker has specifically said this is not what he's looking for. Never mind.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +3
preserved/cured + name of animal (meat)


Explanation:
The Micmac took what was needed and wasted little. The meat was cured. The rib cage was sometimes cooked whole, mounted over a fire or left under a tin stove. When cooked the ribs were withdrawn and the slab of meat rolled and packed. The head was roasted, suspended over an open fire or boiled in a large pot. The resulting combination of flesh, fat and brain assumed a texture like tinned corned beef when cooled. Entrails were eaten; intestines were flushed and plaited. After a kill hunters often indulged in a “gut feed,” boiling intestines with liver, heart and lungs. Hip and leg bones were broken into short lengths and boiled until the fat melted. The marrow was removed and either eaten alone or mixed with fat. “I give you a taste of it and I'll have to drive you off with my gun,” advises Peter Oliver of Bay St. George. “We didn't waste anything, never threw anything away, except maybe for the feet. Even then some of us used to eat them too, like the pig's feet you can buy in the stores today.”

Black bears were hunted as they fed on ripe berries on the barrens and rocky hillsides. Bear fat was rendered in a large pot. Sometimes caribou fat was added to produce a firmer texture. Blood and other impurities were skimmed off and the melted fat was poured into birch bark vessels and left to cool overnight. The rendered fat, muinomi, was used as cooking oil and butter. In fall a prime bear yielded considerable fat, enough to fill a large flour sack in some cases.

Bear meat was eaten fresh or preserved either by smoking or boiling in salted water. Cormack learned bear meat was “by many of the Indians esteemed next to that of the beaver's, and it has the peculiar quality of not clogging the stomach, however much of it is eaten.” Organs and entrails were eaten as a matter of taste. One old hunter, Noel Louis, used bear stomach in a unique fashion. It was turned inside out, stuffed with caribou or beaver, sewn tight and boiled for several hours. The stomach, if properly sewn, would preserve the stuffing for some time.

http://storiesofconneriver.ca/EN/history/hunting_trapping.ph...

Preserved Lamb Meat
Back to the archive >
Sloi

Sloi is a product typically prepared in autumn in Marginimea Sibiului, Bran and Hunedoara (pastoral communities around the Carpathian Mountains), when the sheep return from the mountains.

http://www.fondazioneslowfood.com/en/ark-of-taste-slow-food/...

How to Cure Meat

Curing is a technique which basically involves preserving the meat in salt. This was one of the most common ways of keeping meat fresh in the days before refrigeration. Some still use it today, but now it is more about enhancing the flavor of the meat, not about preserving it.

http://www.survivopedia.com/how-to-preserve-meat/

Helena Chavarria
Spain
Local time: 22:45
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Notes to answerer
Asker: who ever said the "Eskimo" doesn't eat greens? I understand that one of the delicacies was to suck the intestines of caribou, seal etc. what a rich source of vegetation, fiber and vitamins that must be!


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Veronika McLaren
9 hrs
  -> Thank you, Veronika. After I posted my answer I reread the discussion and I realised that you had already suggested an answer very similar to mine. I honestly hadn't see it.

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa: This is also easy to understand.
16 hrs
  -> Thank you, Yasutomo :-)

agree  GILOU: oui
11 days
  -> Merci, GILOU :-)
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
venison


Explanation:
venison is meat from deer and other members of the family

if not from deer (the usual venison meat)
just add moose venison, elk venison etc.

https://www.reference.com/pets-animals/animal-venison-come-8...

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Note added at 35 mins (2016-09-09 10:28:50 GMT)
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SORRY!

jUST REALISED YOU WERE LOOKING FOR THE BACON PART


JUST ADD THAT TO "VENISON"

SO <B>VENISON BACON, ELK VENISON BACON ETC




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Note added at 36 mins (2016-09-09 10:29:33 GMT)
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VENISON BACON, ELK VENISON BACON etc.

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Note added at 40 mins (2016-09-09 10:33:48 GMT)
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though it seems that venison bacon has pork added to it
https://www.leaf.tv/articles/how-to-make-venison-bacon/

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Note added at 50 mins (2016-09-09 10:43:43 GMT)
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Your initial question wasn't very clear. But you just add the word "venison" (from animals in the cervid family) to the part of meat
so yes, "venison bacon" IS correct!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Venison

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Note added at 55 mins (2016-09-09 10:48:18 GMT)
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I didn't know this! (from the last link)
"...Organ meats of deer are eaten, but would not be called venison. Rather, they are called umbles (originally noumbles). This is supposedly the origins of the phrase "humble pie", literally a pie made from the organs of the deer..."

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Note added at 1 hr (2016-09-09 11:05:05 GMT)
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pemmican, jerky
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pemmican

most likely for Polar exploration
http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarctica fact file/science/f...

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Note added at 1 hr (2016-09-09 11:09:16 GMT)
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http://highsteaks.com/carnivores-creed/pemmican/

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Note added at 1 hr (2016-09-09 11:27:24 GMT)
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question changed again?...so now it's a side of bacon?= flitch! which is a word from Norse

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/flitch

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Note added at 3 hrs (2016-09-09 13:14:06 GMT)
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OK, my final comment
I understand you don't want to use "venison bacon" etc. as I agree it could be unwieldy, so why not just use the term "spek" and explain it the first time as "cured/salted (fatty)meat" (except venison is quite lean) or else perhaps "cured/pickled meat from various animals" and then just use "spek" (in italics) afterwards.
The problem with using the English spelling "speck" is that it doesn't seem to be the same thing at all as this usually refers to a type of Austrian/Italian bacon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speck
http://www.foodgeeks.com/encyclopedia/304



Yvonne Gallagher
Ireland
Local time: 21:45
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 16
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9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
bacon [from other animals]
... bacon


Explanation:
It is quite common nowadays to use the terms 'bacon' and 'ham' to refer to the same kind of meats prepared from different animals; I really don't see any problem with using it here, even if it does lead to some terms that sound unwieldy simply because they are unfamiliar.

Tony M
France
Local time: 22:45
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 24
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lingua 5B: it is definitely used that way in my language, eg. turkey ham (both official and colloquial use). the only problem here may be reference from the beginning of the 20th century and potential different usages and connotations of the term at the time.
53 mins
  -> Thanks, Lingua! The eternel problem: do we use modern language so the reader can understand and identify with it; or use archaic 'period' language which may leave the reader uncomprehending and alienated?

agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa: This is may be the most comprehensive term even for non-native speakers like me.
9 hrs
  -> Thanks, Yasutomo-san!

neutral  Yvonne Gallagher: I suggested this (qualified by animal) + 9hrs before you (as in original question). Changed to "pemmican" (ahead of CD!) when polar expeditions was added as I don't think "bacon" is suitable at all here & unless qualified =pork.
16 hrs
  -> As this wasn't your headword answer, and your answer was rather long and 'evolutionary', I didn't even notice you HAD suggested it... But in any case, I think it merited to be pulled out and given an answer of its own.

agree  acetran
2 days 13 hrs
  -> Thanks, Ace!
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1 day 22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): -1
lard


Explanation:
Not as a translation of bacon, obviously, but as a more general term for animal fat, possibly useable here.

Agneta Pallinder
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:45
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish, Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: I think this kind of misses the point, as in EN-GB at least it refers (almost?) exclusively to rendered PORK fat — and pure, non-cured fat only, not fatty meat. So really, this doesn't cover the requirement here on either count.
3 mins
  -> Agreed, in current parlance more a translation of "ister". I was inspired by the verb, really, to lard lean meat by stuffing it with pieces of fat.
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Reference comments


13 mins peer agreement (net): +3
Reference: Ref.

Reference information:
Meat from other animals, such as beef, lamb, chicken, goat, or turkey, may also be cut, cured, or otherwise prepared to resemble bacon, and may even be referred to as "bacon".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bacon
Lingua 5B
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in SerbianSerbian, Native in CroatianCroatian

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
agree  Tony M
1 day 22 hrs
agree  Yasutomo Kanazawa
2 days 22 hrs
agree  acetran
2 days 23 hrs
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