inscousant

French translation: inconstant

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
English term or phrase:inscousant
French translation:inconstant
Entered by: FX Fraipont

12:47 Mar 22, 2017
English to French translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Geology
English term or phrase: inscousant
I've come across this term but I can't find a definition for this word.
ng_trad (X)
France
Local time: 12:09
inconstant
Explanation:
2 Ghits, pointing to the same blog, and about poetry, and concluding "there is no such word".

I would suggest a typo for "insouciant" (but it's discarded in the context of the blog), or inconstant.

Besides, If you expect to receive any meaningful help, give us some context.
You have the full context and you don't understand.
We have "inscousant" and "geology" + "art/history" as a field, which is a puzzle in itself.

"Sightlines is written by an established writer who is also Professor of Creative Writing at Stirling U in Scotland. Being a writer, especially a poet, is possible if you have tuberculosis and are starving in a garret (worked for Keats) but you get to travel a bit if you're a Professor - either on your own nickel or at someone else's expense. Kathleen Jamie has made copy out of St. Kilda [bloboprev], Greenland, North Rona, paleolithic caves in Spain, the moon and the whale museum in Bergen. No, she hasn't been to the moon, no woman has, but she's made the logistically difficult trek to those other places and found something poetic and interesting to say about them. You know she's a poet because, on page 2 she writes "Goose feathers, caught on the dry leaves and twigs, frittering in the terse breeze". Terse breeze? that's arresting because it's not quite right. But maybe she worked long and hard to craft that sentence so that it was both arresting and true to the poet's experience. The next page the breeze has changed: "It’s a stern breeze, blowing from the land, inscousant now, but, like everything here, it carries a sense of enormous strength withheld." Inscousant? I don't think that's a word - it's used nowhere else in the googleverse. Typo for insouciant? but it can hardly be both stern and insouciant?? Later, in the chapter on an eclipse of the moon, two more challenging words appear: "A shadow crept onwards, upwards, smooring the moon's light as it went . . ." and later "A smirr of cloud drifted across." Now smirr is a good Scots word, which she uses in another essay about the moon: "It shone through a smirr of cloud, spreading its diffused light across the water."
http://blobthescientist.blogspot.be/2016/07/sightlines.html
Selected response from:

FX Fraipont
Belgium
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
1inconstant
FX Fraipont


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 1/5Answerer confidence 1/5
inconstant


Explanation:
2 Ghits, pointing to the same blog, and about poetry, and concluding "there is no such word".

I would suggest a typo for "insouciant" (but it's discarded in the context of the blog), or inconstant.

Besides, If you expect to receive any meaningful help, give us some context.
You have the full context and you don't understand.
We have "inscousant" and "geology" + "art/history" as a field, which is a puzzle in itself.

"Sightlines is written by an established writer who is also Professor of Creative Writing at Stirling U in Scotland. Being a writer, especially a poet, is possible if you have tuberculosis and are starving in a garret (worked for Keats) but you get to travel a bit if you're a Professor - either on your own nickel or at someone else's expense. Kathleen Jamie has made copy out of St. Kilda [bloboprev], Greenland, North Rona, paleolithic caves in Spain, the moon and the whale museum in Bergen. No, she hasn't been to the moon, no woman has, but she's made the logistically difficult trek to those other places and found something poetic and interesting to say about them. You know she's a poet because, on page 2 she writes "Goose feathers, caught on the dry leaves and twigs, frittering in the terse breeze". Terse breeze? that's arresting because it's not quite right. But maybe she worked long and hard to craft that sentence so that it was both arresting and true to the poet's experience. The next page the breeze has changed: "It’s a stern breeze, blowing from the land, inscousant now, but, like everything here, it carries a sense of enormous strength withheld." Inscousant? I don't think that's a word - it's used nowhere else in the googleverse. Typo for insouciant? but it can hardly be both stern and insouciant?? Later, in the chapter on an eclipse of the moon, two more challenging words appear: "A shadow crept onwards, upwards, smooring the moon's light as it went . . ." and later "A smirr of cloud drifted across." Now smirr is a good Scots word, which she uses in another essay about the moon: "It shone through a smirr of cloud, spreading its diffused light across the water."
http://blobthescientist.blogspot.be/2016/07/sightlines.html

FX Fraipont
Belgium
Local time: 12:09
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 150
Notes to answerer
Asker: Merci

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search