sweet scallion

French translation: Background info - not for points

13:51 Nov 21, 2006
English to French translations [Non-PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
English term or phrase: sweet scallion
Thai Styled grilled chicken breast, marinated in fresh herbs, garlic and soy sauce. Served with a sweet scallion sauce and rice pilaf.
cathie
French translation:Background info - not for points
Explanation:
Scallion - Also known as green onion or bunching onion in the USA, spring onion in the UK and strangely enough, shallot in Australia, this aromatic plant has been cultivated in China for over 2,000 years. A scallion is an immature onion with long green stems and a small under developed white bulb at the root end, both of which are edible. Because of its crisp, sharp fresh taste and its bright green and white color, it is used extensively in Chinese cooking. The scallion has a slightly hot flavor that is milder than the common onion but stronger than chives. See also leeks.

Chinese chives - Also known as garlic chives, the Chinese chive has been cultivated in China for over 2,000 years and is used extensively in Chinese cooking. Unlike regular chives, these have flat leaves and a distinct garlicky flavor. Chinese chives can be substituted by garlic shoots OR chives (not as pungent as Chinese chives) OR flowering chives. See also chives and Yellowing Chinese chives.

http://www.chinesefood-recipes.com/glossary_of_ingredients/i...

Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:30
Grading comment
Thank you all for your contributions.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4oignon vert
Tony M
4ciboule chinoise
swisstell
4échalotes douces
Bram Poldervaart
2 +1Background info - not for points
Kim Metzger


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
échalotes douces


Explanation:
4 grosses échalotes douces. - 2 gousses d'ail. - 8 cuillères à soupe d'huile d'arachide. - 1 branche de thym - 3 feuilles de laurier

Bram Poldervaart
Local time: 19:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Tony M: Not the most usual translation of 'scallion', nor again, especially likely in Thai cuisine // dangerous to use this ambiguous term, UNLESS you specifically state "Australian readers only!"; if you used European shallots, the result would be disastrous!
2 mins

neutral  Kim Metzger: It's a scallion sauce that is sweet, I think. Sauce échalotes/ciboule? http://www.france5.fr/escapades/viandes/W00390/92/
2 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Marijke Mayer: http://www.3abnaustralia.org.au/recipes/glossary.html
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
ciboule chinoise


Explanation:
which is sweet by nature, so that you can delete the specific mention of "sweet" in the description. It is a trype of "spring onion".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2006-11-21 14:02:51 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ciboule chinoise Xotica 'Gau Choi' - Fruits - Herbes aromatiques - La ciboule chinoise a une douce saveur aillée appréciée dans les salades, les potages, ...
www.bakker.fr/Catalog/Productdetail.aspx?N=900352&productid... -


swisstell
Italy
Local time: 19:30
Native speaker of: German

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Tony M: Actually, I think Kim has got a point there; in any event, your attack on him is totally unjustified! // This is NOT the right place to rake up the past and wage personal wars!
3 mins
  -> if the proven record is 200 disagrees, 20 neutrals and 1 agree (for alibi purposes) in 6 months, it is not an unjustified "attack" but a statement of facts (about which you do not know enough to be the judge of)

agree  Sandra C.
40 mins
  -> grazie mille, Sandra

agree  roneill
1 hr
  -> thank you so much

disagree  Kim Metzger: That would be garlic chives, not scallions. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garlic_chives It's a scallion sauce that is sweet. Scallions are not garlic chives.
1 hr
  -> your reference does NOT give you the intimate knowledge of Far Eastern fare (as I have it from having lived there for a decade). Your "input" is not only not helping the asker but does not succeed in your only purpose: trying to annoy me.

disagree  Marijke Mayer: I know one can make an excellent sweet sauce with scallions, but I'm not so sure if you can make a sauce with green onions!
2 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
scallion
oignon vert


Explanation:
I think Im is right, it is just a sweet sauce made using scallions.

However, these are known as spring or salad onions in the UK, a very common ingredient in Oriental cuisine, quite different from shallots (much more common in French cuisine!)


Tony M
France
Local time: 19:30
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 126

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kim Metzger: Sauce ciboule?
4 mins
  -> Thanks a lot, Kim! // Sounds like a good idea, though I can't honestly say I've ever come across it over here in France. Not what they call it in any of the Chinese/Thai restaurants I've eaten in.

disagree  Marijke Mayer: If you boil green onions, they'll turn bitter. This type of onion you refer to are chopped to sprinkle over Asian food, but are never used in a sauce.
5 mins
  -> Sorry, Marijke, but that's simply not true! I do a lot of Oriental cooking, and green onions ARE used in exactly this sort of way in all sorts of (lightly!) cooked dishes — who on earth said anything about 'boiling', for heaven's sake?!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Background info - not for points


Explanation:
Scallion - Also known as green onion or bunching onion in the USA, spring onion in the UK and strangely enough, shallot in Australia, this aromatic plant has been cultivated in China for over 2,000 years. A scallion is an immature onion with long green stems and a small under developed white bulb at the root end, both of which are edible. Because of its crisp, sharp fresh taste and its bright green and white color, it is used extensively in Chinese cooking. The scallion has a slightly hot flavor that is milder than the common onion but stronger than chives. See also leeks.

Chinese chives - Also known as garlic chives, the Chinese chive has been cultivated in China for over 2,000 years and is used extensively in Chinese cooking. Unlike regular chives, these have flat leaves and a distinct garlicky flavor. Chinese chives can be substituted by garlic shoots OR chives (not as pungent as Chinese chives) OR flowering chives. See also chives and Yellowing Chinese chives.

http://www.chinesefood-recipes.com/glossary_of_ingredients/i...



Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:30
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thank you all for your contributions.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Tony M: Thanks, Kim, that's exactly how I understand it; not a whisper about shallots anywhere, please note! The flavour would be quite wrong! // Indeed, you're right! Says it all, really, doesn't it? ;-)
5 mins
  -> Except for the Aussies!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs (or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.

KudoZ™ translation help

The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.


See also:

Your current localization setting

English

Select a language

Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search