smout

English translation: seasoned lard/pigs\' schmalz/pork dripping/lard

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:smout
English translation:seasoned lard/pigs\' schmalz/pork dripping/lard
Entered by: Richard Purdom

11:39 Mar 27, 2015
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
Dutch term or phrase: smout
From a Flemish cookbook on curing hams with a 'smoutlaag'. I thought this was lard, but then I came across;

Dat smout is ook al zo’n ambachtelijk product en is eigenlijk gewoon een reuzel (gesmolten varkensvet), waaraan peper, zout en boekweit is toegevoegd.

How can I differentiate between 'smout' and 'reuzel'?
Thanks in advance for any contributions.
Richard Purdom
Portugal
Local time: 01:08
seasoned lard/pigs' schmalz/pork dripping/lard
Explanation:
Lard is normally just pig fat. However, here the context is in terms of 'seasoned lard'. Germans and Jews also make/eat 'schmaltz,' which is based on chicken or goose fat; again sometimes it's also seasoned to make it more directly edible. with 'smout' we have again have a culinary term that seems to be specific to Flanders. One may possible assume that the word originates from German/Yiddish. The problem with localized culinary terms is that one often has to work out what the nearest term is in the target language. you may fing this link of general use: http://www.foodlexicon.net
Selected response from:

Andrew Howitt
Netherlands
Local time: 02:08
Grading comment
thanks, 'seasoned' makes the distinction I needed
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2lard
Filip Lommaert
5seasoned lard/pigs' schmalz/pork dripping/lard
Andrew Howitt
4molten lard
Stieneke Hulshof
Summary of reference entries provided
writeaway

Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
lard


Explanation:
In Flanders (where I come from) "smout" always comes in its pure form when you buy it at the butchers, hence it is lard. Restaurants and some butchers who are involved in catering have started to add ingredients. This is in order to follow trends seen in cookery shows and magazines. But, I can assure you that all the smout that I bought, and I love the stuff, was pure. It is delicious on a slice of fresh brown bread with some salt and a good sprinkling of black pepper.

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Note added at 12 mins (2015-03-27 11:51:57 GMT)
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I just checked on the site of Vion (http://www.vionfoodgroup.com/), an international food company in the Netherlands, specialising in animal food products, and they call "smout", pork lard in English

Filip Lommaert
United Kingdom
Local time: 01:08
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Kirsten Bodart: Wouldn't know what else to call it.
11 mins

agree  David Walker (X): Always been lard to me
46 mins
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
molten lard


Explanation:
I deduce from the information that you get 'smout' or 'reuzel' when you melt the lard.
So it's more 'grease' or 'fat'.
I don't think you can differentiate between 'smout' and 'reuzel'.

Stieneke Hulshof
Spain
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
seasoned lard/pigs' schmalz/pork dripping/lard


Explanation:
Lard is normally just pig fat. However, here the context is in terms of 'seasoned lard'. Germans and Jews also make/eat 'schmaltz,' which is based on chicken or goose fat; again sometimes it's also seasoned to make it more directly edible. with 'smout' we have again have a culinary term that seems to be specific to Flanders. One may possible assume that the word originates from German/Yiddish. The problem with localized culinary terms is that one often has to work out what the nearest term is in the target language. you may fing this link of general use: http://www.foodlexicon.net


    Reference: http://www.foodlexicon.net
Andrew Howitt
Netherlands
Local time: 02:08
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
thanks, 'seasoned' makes the distinction I needed

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Kirsten Bodart: Not a loanword from German, but one that came with the Germanic languages and evolved in German and Dutch separately. Already in use in the 1100s in Dutch. http://www.etymologiebank.nl/trefwoord/smout The English term 'lard' came with French and Latin.
18 mins
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Reference comments


2 hrs
Reference

Reference information:
(in België) broodbeleg
dripping
reuzel lard


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Note added at 2 hrs (2015-03-27 13:49:24 GMT)
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source: Van Dale Nl-En (the ref fired off before I was ready)

writeaway
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 33
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