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voorslag

English translation: knock back; punch down

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:voorslag; voorslaan
English translation:knock back; punch down
Entered by: Michael Beijer

19:14 Jan 24, 2014
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Food & Drink
Dutch term or phrase: voorslag
Text about food preparation and it says you have to 'geef een voorslag' before placing the dough on a baking sheet. I can find Google hits but not an explanation or the right English term
Kathy Freeman
Local time: 22:54
knock back; punch down
Explanation:
Just asked my wife, and she said that it's called 'knocking back', or 'punching down'.

Have a look here: 'Similar to kneading is knocking back or punching down, which is done to the dough after proving. The dough is punched once or twice, after which it is kneaded gently for a short time. The aim of this is to remove any large air pockets which have formed in the dough, create an even texture in the bread and redistribute the nutrients for the yeast, thus allowing fermentation to continue. The dough can then be proved a second time. Another method of knocking back (also known as "folding") is to gently stretch and pat out the proved dough before folding the sides in towards the centre.' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kneading )

'Question: What is meant when a bread recipe asks you to 'knock back' the dough?

Answer: Knocking back the dough is often termed punching down the dough. Just give it a good jab with your fist a couple of times and a bit of a knead to get all the extra air out so you can shape it.'

(http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=2008021307575... )
Selected response from:

Michael Beijer
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:54
Grading comment
Of course - many thanks to your wife Michael. As soon as I saw this term I recognised it as correct.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +7knock back; punch down
Michael Beijer
3gently deflate
Hans Geluk
3pre-kneading
freekfluweel


  

Answers


13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
pre-kneading


Explanation:
http://www.annegien.nl/bakkerijrecepten/bakkerijrecepten/get...

http://williamalexander.com/bread/kneading.cfm

freekfluweel
Netherlands
Local time: 23:54
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Hans Geluk: I understand that the 'voorslag' is post, not pre-kneading.
4 mins
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
gently deflate


Explanation:
In Dutch recipes the term 'voorslag' is quite common but I have not found an exact equivalent in English. Usually it is described as 'deflate'.


    Reference: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/classic-baguettes-and...
Hans Geluk
Spain
Local time: 23:54
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +7
knock back; punch down


Explanation:
Just asked my wife, and she said that it's called 'knocking back', or 'punching down'.

Have a look here: 'Similar to kneading is knocking back or punching down, which is done to the dough after proving. The dough is punched once or twice, after which it is kneaded gently for a short time. The aim of this is to remove any large air pockets which have formed in the dough, create an even texture in the bread and redistribute the nutrients for the yeast, thus allowing fermentation to continue. The dough can then be proved a second time. Another method of knocking back (also known as "folding") is to gently stretch and pat out the proved dough before folding the sides in towards the centre.' (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kneading )

'Question: What is meant when a bread recipe asks you to 'knock back' the dough?

Answer: Knocking back the dough is often termed punching down the dough. Just give it a good jab with your fist a couple of times and a bit of a knead to get all the extra air out so you can shape it.'

(http://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=2008021307575... )

Michael Beijer
United Kingdom
Local time: 22:54
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Of course - many thanks to your wife Michael. As soon as I saw this term I recognised it as correct.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Walker (X): Used to bake my own bread and always Knocked it back after it had risen for the first time. It worked too.
14 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  Kirsten Bodart: I think that's pretty comprehensive :). What it means probably depends on the type of bread you're making./see a Dutch ref. https://sites.google.com/site/vaktermenuitdebakkerijwereld/h...
21 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  FionaT: Knocking back, absolutely right!
40 mins
  -> Thanks!

agree  leacarter: After an initial rising, the dough is 'knocked back' before shaping or a second proving.
15 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Hans Geluk
17 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  Barend van Zadelhoff: I don't know whether this is idiomatic, authentic English (my native ears tell me...) - true, your wife says it - however, from a purely rationally, logically linguistic perspective this does make sense. :-) In fact, I have even seen this happen.
17 hrs
  -> Thanks Barend!

agree  Maria Danielson: I used to work as a baker. In US English we say "punch down."
2 days 4 hrs
  -> Thanks!
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