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"boerentarwe brood"

English translation: farmhouse wheat bread

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:\"boerentarwe brood\"
English translation:farmhouse wheat bread
Entered by: Serge Wolff

11:58 Apr 23, 2013
Dutch to English translations [Non-PRO]
Food & Drink / translation of a menu
Dutch term or phrase: "boerentarwe brood"
Context van de menukaart (Om mee te beginnen): Boerentarwe brood met kruidenboter, pesto en aioli
Serge Wolff
Netherlands
Local time: 00:17
farmhouse wheat bread
Explanation:
As I said in my comment, that's what I would translate it as. Sounds natural, expresses what it is in Dutch.

I have only submitted this answer as there are a few who prefer it to the options that have been given already.
Selected response from:

Kirsten Bodart
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:17
Grading comment
Thanks to all for thinking with me. I think all the options given were good so I would like to explain my choice:

• farmhouse:
o It is preferred over ‘farmer’s’ by most of you.
o It is found twice as much on Google compared to ‘farmer’s wheat bread’.
• wheat:
o It is preferred over ‘wheaten’ by most of you.
o It is idiomatically correct and of current usage.
• bread (added):
o It is translated for tourists who may not be English at all and I don’t want to run the risk of misunderstanding as it is something to start with on the menu, not necessarily bread.

4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +5farmer's wheat
Lianne van de Ven
3 +4farmhouse wheaten bread
Tony M
4farmhouse wheat bread
Kirsten Bodart


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
farmer's wheat


Explanation:
How about this. It is not uncommon to leave out "bread".
http://www.breadsmith.com/breads/farmerswheat.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2013-04-23 12:24:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Please look at Friday's menu:
http://www.breadsmith.com/locations/hattiesburg-menu.pdf

The “Gardner”
Fresh tomato, onion, carrot, cucumber, avocado, sprouts, carrots, provolone, cheddar and balsamic vinaigrette on farmer’s wheat or in a sun - dried tomato wrap.
http://m.citysearch.com/profile/menu/45612378

Lianne van de Ven
United States
Local time: 18:17
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  philgoddard: You can't leave out 'bread' here though. It's been left out in your example because it's a list of breads.
7 mins
  -> Why not, on a menu that looks good? Think Subway...

agree  Wiard Sterk: Call it a farmer's wheat loaf and your there. Spot on. - Second thoughts, you wouldn't have a whole loaf for lunch, perhaps ... .
16 mins
  -> :-)

agree  Kirsten Bodart: or with bread after it. The Dutch is wrongly spelled, as so often these days. You could probably also call it 'farmhouse wheat bread' or something. It's not the tarwe which is from the farmer per se (isn't it always?), but the bread.
30 mins
  -> You are right. It's boerentarwebrood, and it's a qualifier for the bread, not the wheat.

agree  Chris Hopley: I actually prefer Kirsten's 'farmhouse wheat'
1 hr
  -> I understand, we don't use it in the US as far as I know.

agree  writeaway: also prefer farmhouse wheat and yes we most certainly do use it in the US:http://www.usdiners.com/cgi-bin/menuprint?State=DC&ID=435DEF...
1 hr
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39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
boerentarwe brood
farmhouse wheaten bread


Explanation:
For a menu item, this needs to read smoothly and be appetizing.

Since this is not in the context of a list of bread products or types of bread, it would sound odd and non-idiomatic to leave out any mention of the the word 'bread' etc. — unless it was some standard expression like 'pastrami on rye'; though even then, it is only understandable because it is in the context of sandwiches.

Note that 'farmhouse' is much more colloquial in EN, and the quaintly dated 'wheaten' gives a nice touch of quality for a restaurant menu (though of course wouldn't be idiomatic in everyday conversation!)

Tony M
France
Local time: 00:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lianne van de Ven: Definitely sounds good too.
40 mins
  -> Thanks, Lianne!

agree  Chris Hopley: agree with 'farmhouse', but 'wheaten' might come across as a tad precious rather than quaint!
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Chris! Point taken — though i have seen it used in context where I didn't (personally) feel it was precious.

agree  Tina Vonhof: Farmhouse whole wheat bread - whole to emphasize the healthy qualities vs. white wheat bread you can buy in any store.
1 hr
  -> Thanks, Tina! Have qualms, though, about adding 'whole-' — it MAY well be, but MIGHT not be, so a risk of over-interpretation here.

agree  writeaway: here too, agree with Chris. Prefer farmhouse wheat, not wheaten
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, W/A! Fair enough, I think for me the key thing was getting the 'farmhouse' bit right.
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5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
farmhouse wheat bread


Explanation:
As I said in my comment, that's what I would translate it as. Sounds natural, expresses what it is in Dutch.

I have only submitted this answer as there are a few who prefer it to the options that have been given already.

Kirsten Bodart
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:17
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch, Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
Thanks to all for thinking with me. I think all the options given were good so I would like to explain my choice:

• farmhouse:
o It is preferred over ‘farmer’s’ by most of you.
o It is found twice as much on Google compared to ‘farmer’s wheat bread’.
• wheat:
o It is preferred over ‘wheaten’ by most of you.
o It is idiomatically correct and of current usage.
• bread (added):
o It is translated for tourists who may not be English at all and I don’t want to run the risk of misunderstanding as it is something to start with on the menu, not necessarily bread.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)



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