Agogiek

English translation: literally: pedagogy + andragogy; practically: student-centred teaching

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Dutch term or phrase:agogiek
English translation:literally: pedagogy + andragogy; practically: student-centred teaching
Entered by: Barend van Zadelhoff

20:51 May 27, 2020
Dutch to English translations [PRO]
Education / Pedagogy / Course outline Physical Education - Movement Recreation
Dutch term or phrase: Agogiek
Dit komt voor in een beschrijving van een vak 'Brede communicatie'. De hele zin is:

"AGOGIEK: Studenten leren waar agogisch handelen voor staat en hoe je als leraar agogisch handelt in een klas- en schoolcontext." De voorafgaande zin gaat over mondelinge en schriftelijke taalvaardigheden.

Als ik het opzoek vind ik meest referenties over muziek, maar ik kan geen verband vinden tussen dat en lesgeven. Betekent het zoiets als 'interactive teaching'?
Tina Vonhof
Canada
Local time: 01:20
andragogy
Explanation:
Or: 'pedagogy and andragogy' when 'agogiek' is used as an umbrella term.

andragogiek: 'volwassenenvorming'

Andragogy refers to methods and principles used in adult education.[1][2] The word comes from the Greek ἀνδρ- (andr-), meaning "man", and ἀγωγός (agogos), meaning "leader of". Therefore, andragogy literally means "leading man", whereas "pedagogy" literally means "leading children".[3]

Two primary understandings of "andragogy" exist:
The science of understanding (theory) and supporting (practice) lifelong education of adults.
In the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, a specific theoretical and practical approach. It is based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners as well as teachers as facilitators of learning.
Interpreted broadly throughout academic literature, the term also invites other definitions such as "adult education practice", "desirable values", "specific teaching methods", "reflections", and "academic discipline", with many authors claiming it to be better than traditional adult education.

Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to the motivation of adult learning:[5][6]
- Need to know: Adults need to know the reason for learning something.
- Foundation: Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities.
- Self-concept: Adults need to be responsible for their decisions on education; involvement in the planning and evaluation of their instruction.
- Readiness: Adults are most interested in learning subjects having immediate relevance to their work and/or personal lives.
- Orientation: Adult learning is problem-centered rather than content-oriented.
- Motivation: Adults respond better to internal versus external motivators.

In most European countries, the Knowles discussion played at best, a marginal role. "Andragogy" was, from 1970 on, connected with emerging academic and professional institutions, publications, or programs, triggered by a similar growth of adult education in practice and theory as in the United States.

"Andragogy" functioned here as a header for (places of) systematic reflections, parallel to other academic headers like "biology", "medicine", and "physics".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andragogy

In the late 1960s research emerged that challenged the belief that adults' ability to think declines with age. This new evidence suggested that the level of a person's thinking ability is not merely related to age but that it is also influenced by a person's environment and their social and historical context. In the 1970s the concept of the adult's potential for further development was known as the 'plasticity' model. The realisation that adults were capable of cognitive growth had an impact on lifelong learning and caused educators to question many of the previous assumptions and concepts of adult learning. This led to a re- conceptualisation of the idea that the strategies employed in the teaching of children and adolescents are automatically applicable to the teaching of adults (Nottingham Andragogy Group, 1981).

Amongst those who were attempting to formulate a theory of adult learning was Malcolm Knowles who argued that most of the formal learning theories at that time were based on research with animals and children and bore little resemblance with adult learning (Knowles and Associates, 1984). Knowles also observed that most of the research by educational psychologists in fact focused on reactions to teaching rather than on the process of learning (Knowles and Associates, 1984).

Knowles was first introduced to the term andragogy by a Yugoslavian adult educator, named Dusan Savicevic, who was attending one of Knowles' sessions on adult learning at Boston University in the summer of 1967 (Knowles and Associates, 1984). Knowles, who had already developed a theoretical framework for adult learning, then used the term in an article entitled 'Androgogy, Not Pedagogy' published in Adult Leadership in April 1968. It is interesting to note that Knowles originally misspelled andragogy as 'androgogy'. (Knowles and Associates, 1984; Knowles, 1990).

Though the term andragogy was little known in Anglo-North America prior to the late 1960s, it had been the subject of some controversy in Europe, where it appears to have been used intermittently. A Dutch adult educator, Ger van Enchevort, traced the origins of the term and his findings are summarised by Knowles (1990). The first known use of the term was by Alexander Kapp in 1833. Kapp, a German grammar school teacher used the word to describe the educational theory of the Greek philosopher Plato. A few years later a German philosopher, Johan Friedrick Herbart, strongly opposed its use and the word was forgotten and disappeared for nearly a hundred years.

The term re-emerged in 1921 in a report by Eugen Rosenstock, a teacher at the Academy of Labor in Frankford. In the report he argued that adult education required special teachers, special methods, and a special philosophy. From 1921 until the late 1950s the term was used intermittently. Heinrich Hanselmann, a Swiss psychiatrist used it in his 1951 book: 'Andragogy: Nature, Possibilities and Boundaries of Adult Education'.

In 1954, in the Netherlands, Professor T. T. ten Have used the word andragogy in his lectures; later in 1959 he published outlines for a science of andragogy. In 1956 Yugoslavia M. Ogrizovic published a dissertation:

http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/2177/1/413451.pdf

Agogiek is de leer van het begeleiden, aansturen of beleidsmatig mogelijk maken van veranderingsprocessen bij mensen. Deze sociale wetenschap bestudeert hoe mensen veranderen en geeft aanwijzingen over de manier waarop dit kan worden beïnvloed en begeleid. Agogie verwijst naar het agogisch handelen op zich, de activiteit van het interveniëren in veranderingsprocessen.

De Nederlandse grondlegger van de agogische wetenschappen, T.T. ten Have (1906-1975), gebruikte de term agogie(k) om het onderscheid met de term pedagogiek duidelijker te maken. Meer specifiek maakte hij een onderscheid tussen pedagogiek (gericht op kinderen), andragogiek (gericht op volwassenen) en gerontagogiek (gericht op ouderen). De verschillende doelgroepen vragen immers om een aparte methode. De term agogiek gold in dit opzicht als overkoepelende term. In Nederland spreekt men over andragogiek wanneer men het heeft over volwassenenvorming.

In Vlaanderen heeft het onderscheid in prefixen (andr-, geront-) nooit ingang gevonden. Agogiek wordt er steeds vertaald als volwassenenvorming. Relevanter dan het onderscheid in doelgroep, is de manier waarop de agoog aan de slag gaat: agogiek staat voor een niet-schoolse educatieve aanpak, ook wel informele of niet-formele educatie genoemd.

https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agogiek_(wetenschap)





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 19 hrs (2020-05-29 16:09:09 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Hallo Tina,

Ik ken jouw exacte context niet.
Een letterlijke vertaling voor 'agogiek' = pedagogy + andragogy.
Ik kan me echter goed voorstellen dat een letterlijke vertaling niet past in de context.

'student-centred teaching' past goed bij die 'six assumptions related to the motivation of adult learning' van Knowles (zie boven)

Succes,

Barend

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2020-06-01 10:48:02 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Tina, for future reference it is useful to phrase the glossary reference as: literally: pedagogy + andragogy; practically: student-centred teaching

Please leave as is.

Thank you,

Barend

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2020-06-01 11:23:00 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Ik ben het overigens eens met 'student-centred teaching'.

Goed gevonden!
Selected response from:

Barend van Zadelhoff
Netherlands
Local time: 09:20
Grading comment
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4informally
philgoddard
3andragogy
Barend van Zadelhoff
Summary of reference entries provided
~agogy = (bege)leiden
Lianne van de Ven
refs (just did a quick search of my computer)
Michael Beijer

Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
informally


Explanation:
I don't think we need to use jargon here, especially since this is a course outline for prospective students who won't know what it means.

The last sentence of Barendt's final reference says "agogiek staat voor een niet-schoolse educatieve aanpak, ook wel informele of niet-formele educatie genoemd."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 17 hrs (2020-05-28 14:42:54 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Sorry, the question was "agogiek", the noun. In that case I'd say something like "informal learning".

philgoddard
United States
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Notes to answerer
Asker: See my note to Barend. It's indeed a more informal approach than 'regular' teaching but still a well-defined approach approach with its own rules and, as I found out, its own name.

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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
agogiek
andragogy


Explanation:
Or: 'pedagogy and andragogy' when 'agogiek' is used as an umbrella term.

andragogiek: 'volwassenenvorming'

Andragogy refers to methods and principles used in adult education.[1][2] The word comes from the Greek ἀνδρ- (andr-), meaning "man", and ἀγωγός (agogos), meaning "leader of". Therefore, andragogy literally means "leading man", whereas "pedagogy" literally means "leading children".[3]

Two primary understandings of "andragogy" exist:
The science of understanding (theory) and supporting (practice) lifelong education of adults.
In the tradition of Malcolm Knowles, a specific theoretical and practical approach. It is based on a humanistic conception of self-directed and autonomous learners as well as teachers as facilitators of learning.
Interpreted broadly throughout academic literature, the term also invites other definitions such as "adult education practice", "desirable values", "specific teaching methods", "reflections", and "academic discipline", with many authors claiming it to be better than traditional adult education.

Knowles' theory can be stated with six assumptions related to the motivation of adult learning:[5][6]
- Need to know: Adults need to know the reason for learning something.
- Foundation: Experience (including error) provides the basis for learning activities.
- Self-concept: Adults need to be responsible for their decisions on education; involvement in the planning and evaluation of their instruction.
- Readiness: Adults are most interested in learning subjects having immediate relevance to their work and/or personal lives.
- Orientation: Adult learning is problem-centered rather than content-oriented.
- Motivation: Adults respond better to internal versus external motivators.

In most European countries, the Knowles discussion played at best, a marginal role. "Andragogy" was, from 1970 on, connected with emerging academic and professional institutions, publications, or programs, triggered by a similar growth of adult education in practice and theory as in the United States.

"Andragogy" functioned here as a header for (places of) systematic reflections, parallel to other academic headers like "biology", "medicine", and "physics".

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andragogy

In the late 1960s research emerged that challenged the belief that adults' ability to think declines with age. This new evidence suggested that the level of a person's thinking ability is not merely related to age but that it is also influenced by a person's environment and their social and historical context. In the 1970s the concept of the adult's potential for further development was known as the 'plasticity' model. The realisation that adults were capable of cognitive growth had an impact on lifelong learning and caused educators to question many of the previous assumptions and concepts of adult learning. This led to a re- conceptualisation of the idea that the strategies employed in the teaching of children and adolescents are automatically applicable to the teaching of adults (Nottingham Andragogy Group, 1981).

Amongst those who were attempting to formulate a theory of adult learning was Malcolm Knowles who argued that most of the formal learning theories at that time were based on research with animals and children and bore little resemblance with adult learning (Knowles and Associates, 1984). Knowles also observed that most of the research by educational psychologists in fact focused on reactions to teaching rather than on the process of learning (Knowles and Associates, 1984).

Knowles was first introduced to the term andragogy by a Yugoslavian adult educator, named Dusan Savicevic, who was attending one of Knowles' sessions on adult learning at Boston University in the summer of 1967 (Knowles and Associates, 1984). Knowles, who had already developed a theoretical framework for adult learning, then used the term in an article entitled 'Androgogy, Not Pedagogy' published in Adult Leadership in April 1968. It is interesting to note that Knowles originally misspelled andragogy as 'androgogy'. (Knowles and Associates, 1984; Knowles, 1990).

Though the term andragogy was little known in Anglo-North America prior to the late 1960s, it had been the subject of some controversy in Europe, where it appears to have been used intermittently. A Dutch adult educator, Ger van Enchevort, traced the origins of the term and his findings are summarised by Knowles (1990). The first known use of the term was by Alexander Kapp in 1833. Kapp, a German grammar school teacher used the word to describe the educational theory of the Greek philosopher Plato. A few years later a German philosopher, Johan Friedrick Herbart, strongly opposed its use and the word was forgotten and disappeared for nearly a hundred years.

The term re-emerged in 1921 in a report by Eugen Rosenstock, a teacher at the Academy of Labor in Frankford. In the report he argued that adult education required special teachers, special methods, and a special philosophy. From 1921 until the late 1950s the term was used intermittently. Heinrich Hanselmann, a Swiss psychiatrist used it in his 1951 book: 'Andragogy: Nature, Possibilities and Boundaries of Adult Education'.

In 1954, in the Netherlands, Professor T. T. ten Have used the word andragogy in his lectures; later in 1959 he published outlines for a science of andragogy. In 1956 Yugoslavia M. Ogrizovic published a dissertation:

http://usir.salford.ac.uk/id/eprint/2177/1/413451.pdf

Agogiek is de leer van het begeleiden, aansturen of beleidsmatig mogelijk maken van veranderingsprocessen bij mensen. Deze sociale wetenschap bestudeert hoe mensen veranderen en geeft aanwijzingen over de manier waarop dit kan worden beïnvloed en begeleid. Agogie verwijst naar het agogisch handelen op zich, de activiteit van het interveniëren in veranderingsprocessen.

De Nederlandse grondlegger van de agogische wetenschappen, T.T. ten Have (1906-1975), gebruikte de term agogie(k) om het onderscheid met de term pedagogiek duidelijker te maken. Meer specifiek maakte hij een onderscheid tussen pedagogiek (gericht op kinderen), andragogiek (gericht op volwassenen) en gerontagogiek (gericht op ouderen). De verschillende doelgroepen vragen immers om een aparte methode. De term agogiek gold in dit opzicht als overkoepelende term. In Nederland spreekt men over andragogiek wanneer men het heeft over volwassenenvorming.

In Vlaanderen heeft het onderscheid in prefixen (andr-, geront-) nooit ingang gevonden. Agogiek wordt er steeds vertaald als volwassenenvorming. Relevanter dan het onderscheid in doelgroep, is de manier waarop de agoog aan de slag gaat: agogiek staat voor een niet-schoolse educatieve aanpak, ook wel informele of niet-formele educatie genoemd.

https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agogiek_(wetenschap)





--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day 19 hrs (2020-05-29 16:09:09 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Hallo Tina,

Ik ken jouw exacte context niet.
Een letterlijke vertaling voor 'agogiek' = pedagogy + andragogy.
Ik kan me echter goed voorstellen dat een letterlijke vertaling niet past in de context.

'student-centred teaching' past goed bij die 'six assumptions related to the motivation of adult learning' van Knowles (zie boven)

Succes,

Barend

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2020-06-01 10:48:02 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Tina, for future reference it is useful to phrase the glossary reference as: literally: pedagogy + andragogy; practically: student-centred teaching

Please leave as is.

Thank you,

Barend

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 days (2020-06-01 11:23:00 GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Ik ben het overigens eens met 'student-centred teaching'.

Goed gevonden!

Barend van Zadelhoff
Netherlands
Local time: 09:20
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 34
Notes to answerer
Asker: Bedankt voor je uitgebreide uitleg. De term Agogy wordt op dit continent in de praktijk niet gebruikt. Ik zocht dus in de eerste plaats naar uitleg in het Nederlands, maar vooral ook naar suggesties voor een Engelse term. Niettemin hielp je antwoord bij het verder zoeken. Agogy kan zowel in pedagogy als in andragogy toegepast worden en betekent dat het niet de leraar is die bepaalt wat en hoe er onderwezen wordt, maar dat de leerlingen zelf in controle zijn van hun eigen leerprocess. Dat heb ik uiteindelijk vertaald als 'student-centred teaching'. En toen ik dat eenmaal bedacht had kon ik die term ook op Engelstalige websites terugvinden.

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Reference comments


1 day 15 hrs
Reference: ~agogy = (bege)leiden

Reference information:
Het achtervoegsel betekent leiden (leading).
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/-agogy

"In seeing supervision as a process of change, it also builds on the principles of Kurt Lewin and uses a series of steps from the conceptual framework of Van Beugen's "agogic action" model."
https://www.jstor.org/stable/23038537?seq=1

Een term die vooral in Europa/NL in gebruik is (was). "The study of agogics includes the guidance processes which involve both children and adults. Change however is unlikely -there may be compelling theoretic reasons, as we shall see, for persisting with the pedagogical framework."
http://www.davidlane.org/children/chaug/aug2000/social_pedag...

Lianne van de Ven
United States
Does not meet criteria
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 52
Note to reference poster
Asker: Dank je wel, Lianne. Dit bevestigt wat ik ook al gezien had, dat de term bijna uitsluitend in Europa gebruikt wordt en dat uitleg dan ook in het Nederlands is. De moeilijkheid was om een vertaling te vinden die ook op dit continent in de praktijk gebruikt wordt.

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2 days 1 hr
Reference: refs (just did a quick search of my computer)

Reference information:
University of Twente Woordenlijst nl-en:
andragogiek =
andragogy
adult educational theory

Juridisch-Economisch Lexicon (JurLex):
sociale agogiek =
social welfare studies
adult educational sciences

random glossary:
agogiek = agogics (music)

IATE:
agogiek =
social, cultural and personal welfare
social guidance

Definition: Aan het begrip agogiek ligt de veronderstelling ten grondslag dat agogische arbeid bepaald wordt door een complex van factoren en zich afspeelt-op een systematische manier-vanuit een bepaalde mens-maatschappij-en levensbeschouwing, vanuit een zekere visie op wat agogisch gewenst is en vanuit een bepaald zicht op de mogelijkheden die de werkwijzen bieden. Dit complex van factoren, waarin vooral het waardenaspect een grote rol speelt, wordt agogiek genoemd. Het is als het ware praktijktheorie

Definition reference: G.Duitemeijer,Encyclopedie van sociale arbeid,Vuga-Boekerij,'s-Gravenhage 1977,p.38.
(https://iate.europa.eu/search/standard/result/1590790779275/... )

Michael Beijer
United Kingdom
Meets criteria
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 48
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