lage

English translation: brine, marinade, pickling liquor, (or when sweet) juice, light syrup

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Danish term or phrase:lage
English translation:brine, marinade, pickling liquor, (or when sweet) juice, light syrup
Entered by: Christine Andersen

09:07 Oct 13, 2006
Danish to English translations [PRO]
Cooking / Culinary
Danish term or phrase: lage
Sentence: "Serveres med mangoparfait med lage af passionsfrugt"

Obviously brine, pickled, marinade and juice don't work in this non-savoury context. Any other ideas?
logan
light syrup
Explanation:
Light syrup

This is used on fruit tins when the fruit is not in its own pure juice, but could also be teh 'lage' in all those recipes for 'syltning' in the Green book in Every Danish kitchen that reminds me of Grandma's preserves.

Light syrup sounds more appetizing than some of the dictionary suggestions for 'lage'.


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Note added at 56 mins (2006-10-13 10:04:25 GMT)
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Good question.
Coulis is quite popular on some of the menus I translate, but does not seem to be in the Danish dictionaries or cookery books I have handy. I just call it coulis when it turns up.

Charles Sinclair's Dictionary of food suggests coulis is thicker than what I immediately connect with 'lage'. I think of something possibly coloured by the fruit etc. but basically clear.

The sweet version of coulis is '... liquidized and sieved fruit, possibly with added sugar, acid or liqueur, consistency adjusted with fruit juice'

-- But would anyone really just boil syrup from passion fruit?
It does of course give you the flavour without the pips, but so does coulis.

Is the rest of the menu very "Frenchified"? (In which case coulis might be fine)
Or is it mostly in straight Danish (the use of 'lage' suggests it might be.)
You could use 'coulis' if it is one of those ambitiously cosmopolitan restaurants, or syrup, light or otherwise, for the 'good home cooking' image.


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Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-13 10:40:30 GMT)
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On balance I'd write syrup or light syrup.
Many chefs are not linguists at all ;-) in my experience, but if they call their accompaniment 'lage' then I guess they don't mean coulis!
Selected response from:

Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 16:00
Grading comment
Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +5light syrup
Christine Andersen
4 -1layer "is served with a layer of passion fruit"
Suzanne Blangsted (X)


  

Answers


18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +5
light syrup


Explanation:
Light syrup

This is used on fruit tins when the fruit is not in its own pure juice, but could also be teh 'lage' in all those recipes for 'syltning' in the Green book in Every Danish kitchen that reminds me of Grandma's preserves.

Light syrup sounds more appetizing than some of the dictionary suggestions for 'lage'.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 56 mins (2006-10-13 10:04:25 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Good question.
Coulis is quite popular on some of the menus I translate, but does not seem to be in the Danish dictionaries or cookery books I have handy. I just call it coulis when it turns up.

Charles Sinclair's Dictionary of food suggests coulis is thicker than what I immediately connect with 'lage'. I think of something possibly coloured by the fruit etc. but basically clear.

The sweet version of coulis is '... liquidized and sieved fruit, possibly with added sugar, acid or liqueur, consistency adjusted with fruit juice'

-- But would anyone really just boil syrup from passion fruit?
It does of course give you the flavour without the pips, but so does coulis.

Is the rest of the menu very "Frenchified"? (In which case coulis might be fine)
Or is it mostly in straight Danish (the use of 'lage' suggests it might be.)
You could use 'coulis' if it is one of those ambitiously cosmopolitan restaurants, or syrup, light or otherwise, for the 'good home cooking' image.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-13 10:40:30 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

On balance I'd write syrup or light syrup.
Many chefs are not linguists at all ;-) in my experience, but if they call their accompaniment 'lage' then I guess they don't mean coulis!

Christine Andersen
Denmark
Local time: 16:00
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 23
Grading comment
Thanks!
Notes to answerer
Asker: Sounds good...It also just occurred to me that this may be what is called 'coulis'. What do you think?


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Derringdo
33 mins

agree  Mads Grøftehauge: Yes. Logan: Don't use 'coulis', which is puréed fruit sauce served with desserts (and sometimes used as a name for a kind of ice cream). Source: R Dale: Dictionary of Culinary and Menu Terms
39 mins

agree  Jan Andre de la Porte
1 hr

agree  Mark Gallacher
7 hrs

agree  Pernille Chapman: Would suit most styles of menu as well.
1 day 7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
layer "is served with a layer of passion fruit"


Explanation:
this is how I read it.

Suzanne Blangsted (X)
Local time: 07:00
Native speaker of: Native in DanishDanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Pernille Chapman: "Layer" in singular (and plural) would be "lag".
1 day 2 hrs
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