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Poll: Do you think that reviewers should be asked to sign a professional code of ethics?
Thread poster: ProZ.com Staff

Richard Purdom  Identity Verified
Portugal
Local time: 16:55
Dutch to English
+ ...
more attempts to make translation a closed profession Apr 28, 2016

Let's face it, such nonsense would only serve the interests of those seeking to make translation a closed profession.
Next stage, only allow those to enter the profession with peer approval, then unilaterally decide rates etc.

There's enough barriers in the world, especially those set up by those who know that what they do can be better done by others (look at Uber vs. trad. taxis for example), let us be judged on our merits not how much peer approval/friends we have (for an e
... See more
Let's face it, such nonsense would only serve the interests of those seeking to make translation a closed profession.
Next stage, only allow those to enter the profession with peer approval, then unilaterally decide rates etc.

There's enough barriers in the world, especially those set up by those who know that what they do can be better done by others (look at Uber vs. trad. taxis for example), let us be judged on our merits not how much peer approval/friends we have (for an example of how that works, look no further than Kodoz, it's like voting blocks in Eurovision!)
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Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
Paper is very patient Apr 28, 2016

Thayenga wrote:

José Henrique Lamensdorf wrote:

So my take is that reviewers, translators, PMs, agencies, end-clients, everybody should HAVE and UPHOLD a strong professional code of ethics. Signing it is a mere formality.


Exactly. As we say: paper is very patient. Just because someone signs something doesn't mean they also practice it. If that was the case, then I'm all for signing such a code of ethics...everybody and in every industry.


In Spanish we'd say “El papel aguanta cualquier cosa”


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 11:55
English to Spanish
+ ...
What is a closed profession? Apr 28, 2016

Richard Purdom wrote:

Let's face it, such nonsense would only serve the interests of those seeking to make translation a closed profession.
Next stage, only allow those to enter the profession with peer approval, then unilaterally decide rates etc.

There's enough barriers in the world, especially those set up by those who know that what they do can be better done by others (look at Uber vs. trad. taxis for example), let us be judged on our merits not how much peer approval/friends we have (for an example of how that works, look no further than Kodoz, it's like voting blocks in Eurovision!)


With due respect, allow me to point to a glaring contradiction: a profession is closed by definition. Not everyone who is good with watercolors is a painter any more than everyone with fingers is a pianist.

Being bilingual is not nearly an acceptable qualification for becoming a professional (i.e. full-time) interpreter or translator. A profession, by definition, is beholden to a certain set of standards. Who creates and enforces those standards? The same professionals, by means of guilds, associations, collegia, etc.

Second problem with your reasoning: a faulty comparison. Uber vs. translators. As we Americans like to say: Are you for real?

I suspect you are a young man (in your 30s) with highly held ideals influenced by a romanticized view of globalization and a strong flavor of Silicon Valley libertarian entrepreneurship.


 

Nele Van den Broeck  Identity Verified
Belgium
Local time: 17:55
French to Dutch
+ ...
Sometimes reviewers can just ... overreact Apr 29, 2016

I agree with what has been said before a couple of times.

I do think that reviewers are necessary, and that their aim is to improve the text.
Sometimes they just overreact though.

I recently experienced a case of "overreacting reviewer" myself.
The reviewer "painted the text red" for no reason (personal preferences, correcting something that was correct to begin with into... a misinterpretation). Although I don't have any problems with reviewers in general
... See more
I agree with what has been said before a couple of times.

I do think that reviewers are necessary, and that their aim is to improve the text.
Sometimes they just overreact though.

I recently experienced a case of "overreacting reviewer" myself.
The reviewer "painted the text red" for no reason (personal preferences, correcting something that was correct to begin with into... a misinterpretation). Although I don't have any problems with reviewers in general, and am not opposed to lifting my translation to a higher level, I just couldn't handle the accusing tone, the fact that the reviewer told me that she wasted almost a day "correcting" my text. If it would have been because of errors on my side, I wouldn't have blamed the reviewer for making me look stupid, but this was something entirely different! I can still honestly say that my translation was a good one, and that is what is most important to me.
Oh and yes... I did more or less lose my client in the end. (I didn't really try to fix it, did not have the energy to do that since the client wasn't a very good client anyway and was quite stubborn.)
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Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:55
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Yes, and much more Apr 30, 2016

I wish there were laws with penalties for revisers that change 12 for a dozen and other synonyms when they find nothing else to correct. Also for those who change a perfect translation into a piece of sh(*)t, as it hapens many times.

A good reviser may be a bless in our lives, but they are very, very rare.


 

Mario Freitas  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:55
Member (2014)
English to Portuguese
+ ...
Training takes the professional to the next level. Apr 30, 2016

Chris S wrote:

Surely what they need is TRAINING.

.


Once they are trained, they become translators.


 

José Henrique Lamensdorf  Identity Verified
Brazil
Local time: 13:55
English to Portuguese
+ ...
In memoriam
Not so sure about it Apr 30, 2016

Mario Freitas wrote:

Chris S wrote:

Surely what they need is TRAINING.


Once they are trained, they become translators.


From my own experience, I think that the best translator/reviewer setup is when both are equally skilled and, most of all, both perceive each other as such.

As I said before, I am frequently part of a trio, two working at a time on each job. Depending on the availability of each one (we all work for other clients too, of course), the PM who got us together will mix'n'match two of us and assign roles.

When all of us are free, my team mates prefer to have me translating, and one of them will review. No stated reason, and I have no complaints about it. We simply don't mind which role each of us will play.

On account of sudden external demands, it has happened once that we swapped roles on the fly. On another occasion, we had a huge request with a shorter-than-usual turnaround time. We split the job in two parts, and swapped roles midway, each one reviewing the other's half. Possibilities are endless.

When I have to review my own work, I take two stances. While translating, I'm faithful to the original writer: I must preserve his/her ideas upon changing the language used to convey them. When I'm reviewing, my 'boss' is the prospective reader: it must sound and feel as originally written for them in their language. Simple as that, but it works!


 
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