Off topic: Fuel Prices Around the World
Thread poster: ATIL KAYHAN

ATIL KAYHAN  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 00:12
Member (2007)
Turkish to English
+ ...
Jan 1, 2013

http://blog.caranddriver.com/global-gouging-a-survey-of-fuel-prices-around-the-world/?src=spr_TWITTER&spr_id=1458_6067598

 

Trudy Peters  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:12
German to English
+ ...
Wow! Jan 1, 2013

What a fantastic graphic! Thanks for posting.

 

Nicole Schnell  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 13:12
English to German
+ ...
In memoriam
The graphic is terrific! Jan 1, 2013

Thanks, Atil!

 

Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:12
Hebrew to English
8.46 Jan 1, 2013

That's why I have a tear in my eye every time I go to fill up at the petrol station. I feel like I'm being mugged every time.

 

ATIL KAYHAN  Identity Verified
Turkey
Local time: 00:12
Member (2007)
Turkish to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
You are most welcome. Jan 2, 2013

I believe it is always nice to have a global perspective.

 

Liviu-Lee Roth
United States
Local time: 16:12
Romanian to English
+ ...
sort of irrelevant ! Jan 2, 2013

In countries where prices are very high, the social network is waaay better than in the US because the high taxes imposed on gas go for such programs (healthcare, education etc.), therefore I'd rather pay $6.00/gallon and have free medical assitance.

my 2 cents


 

Tomás Cano Binder, BA, CT  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 22:12
Member (2005)
English to Spanish
+ ...
Same here Jan 2, 2013

Ty Kendall wrote:
That's why I have a tear in my eye every time I go to fill up at the petrol station. I feel like I'm being mugged every time.

Same feeling here. Especially because in Spain over 70% of the price is made up of different national and regional taxes. Plain crazy.


 

JH Trads  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 16:12
Member (2007)
English to French
+ ...
Thanks Atil, the graphic is great! Jan 2, 2013

Its title, however, is a bit problematic, as this graphic does not allow, in itself, to derive conclusions about gouging. Some countries may have high prices at the pump because of a host of other reasons that may, depending on the case, have nothing to do with gouging: few or no reserves and high transportation costs in the case of Japan, insufficient refinery capacity in Iran (too bad Iran is not shown in the graph) which pushes the price above a normal level for a country blessed with huge re... See more
Its title, however, is a bit problematic, as this graphic does not allow, in itself, to derive conclusions about gouging. Some countries may have high prices at the pump because of a host of other reasons that may, depending on the case, have nothing to do with gouging: few or no reserves and high transportation costs in the case of Japan, insufficient refinery capacity in Iran (too bad Iran is not shown in the graph) which pushes the price above a normal level for a country blessed with huge reserves, a heavy tax policy in Europe that keeps prices up regardless of the fluctuations in the prices of crude. This European tax policy is not all bad, it promotes public transportation (for instance the US, without comparable taxation, has much less public transportation), is socially progressive and is good for the environment, not to mention that the heavy gas taxes have a stabilizing effect, which can smooth the cycles, and make planning and investing easier for companies.
Conversely, the example of Venezuela is presented here in a misleading light, because if the price is so low, and the title of the chart is "gouging", then the natural conclusion is to think: Venezuala=no gouging going on=good. But this nominal price of gas is only obtained through massive subsidies, which jeopardize the finances of that country as it is nothing more than harsh austerity in the waiting (it will be necessary to raise more taxes to cover the subsidy-created debt), masquerading as a generous gift. It is a socially regressive policy to boot! Indeed, it favors the rich who can afford cars/more cars, to the detriment of the poor who will bear the brunt (not the Brent) of all the 'externalities' of such policies. Ironic for a rock-ribbed socialist and populist government!


Also, more generally, the notion of gouging is poorly understood when it comes to oil. Oil drillers face dramatic operational risks (as seen recently in the Gulf Coast). The refiners have to operate profitably. Are they really charging more than other industries, say, the companies crushing soybean into edible oil? Then, the gas stations, which may or may not be vertically integrated with the drillers and or refiners, have themselves very thin profit margins, if any, on gas. They earn their moolah selling artery-clogging deep fried doughnuts and heart-stopping energy drinks.
Collapse


 

Heinrich Pesch  Identity Verified
Finland
Local time: 23:12
Member (2003)
Finnish to German
+ ...
Too cheap everywhere Jan 2, 2013

Taxes should be doubled still, so people would think if it really is necessary to drive a car. Even though European gas price is comparatively high, it is still cheaper to drive a car with two people in it than to use a train or other means.

 

Christel Zipfel  Identity Verified
Member (2004)
Italian to German
+ ...
Only exception among the countries with high-priced fuel: Italy Jan 2, 2013

lee roth wrote:

In countries where prices are very high, the social network is waaay better than in the US because the high taxes imposed on gas go for such programs (healthcare, education etc.), therefore I'd rather pay $6.00/gallon and have free medical assitance.

my 2 cents


You pay a lot and get nothing.


 

Stanislav Pokorny  Identity Verified
Czech Republic
Local time: 22:12
English to Czech
+ ...
Yeah, but... Jan 2, 2013

Heinrich Pesch wrote:

Taxes should be doubled still, so people would think if it really is necessary to drive a car. Even though European gas price is comparatively high, it is still cheaper to drive a car with two people in it than to use a train or other means.


Except that fuel prices are reflected in the price of all other commodities that are delivered by road vehicles, including food.

On top of that, new EU regulations on exhalations (Euro 5 and 6) have added greatly to increased fuel consumption, especially with diesel engines (compare: my previous Skoda Octavia 1.9 TDI: 4.0 litres / 100 km; my new Skoda Octavia 1.9 TDI with DPF and about the same horsepower: 6.0 litres / 100 km).

[Upraveno: 2013-01-02 18:59 GMT]


 

Ty Kendall  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 21:12
Hebrew to English
I was gonna say..... Jan 2, 2013

Christel Zipfel wrote:

lee roth wrote:

In countries where prices are very high, the social network is waaay better than in the US because the high taxes imposed on gas go for such programs (healthcare, education etc.), therefore I'd rather pay $6.00/gallon and have free medical assitance.

my 2 cents


You pay a lot and get nothing.


The NHS isn't much to write home about and the state of the roads and public transport makes you wonder where the money actually goes.


 


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