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Off topic: Cursive writing no longer taught in schools
Thread poster: LegalTranslatr2

Samuel Murray  Identity Verified
Netherlands
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Skoonskrif Sep 8, 2010

Jeff Whittaker wrote:
Schools in the U.S. are no longer teaching cursive or script handwriting. Has this trend spread to other countries?


When I was at school (white South Africa), we were first taught block letters (what you call print) and later running letters (what you call cursive). For a number of years it was compulsory to use running letters except for special classes during which block letter writing was practiced.

By the time I reached high school (grade 8 to grade 12) we could choose which form we liked best, and I chose to use block letters because I can write faster in block letters than in running letters (as the pen has less contact with the paper that way, so the dragging effect is less, and so the speed is better).

Also, we used pencil in the first few years, followed by ball-point pen later. We never used fountain pens at school, but my children (Netherlands) use them -- in fact they don't use ball-point pens. This was a surprise to me.



[Edited at 2010-09-08 09:14 GMT]


 

Christine Andersen  Identity Verified
Denmark
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I was given special treatment! Sep 8, 2010

My early schools used Marion Richardson's ´Writing and Writing Patterns´, which we loved. It was called round hand, and was especially good for me, as I am left handed, and the writing slopes the wrong way if I try to do italic!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Richardson

I went through a phase of writing as minutely as possible, but later gave it up and devel
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My early schools used Marion Richardson's ´Writing and Writing Patterns´, which we loved. It was called round hand, and was especially good for me, as I am left handed, and the writing slopes the wrong way if I try to do italic!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marion_Richardson

I went through a phase of writing as minutely as possible, but later gave it up and developed big tails on my f´s, g´s and y´s.

I always use a fountain pen or the modern fibre tips, as I hold the pen or pencil very obliquely, and can barely use a ball-point without scratching the paper.

I did calligraphy for O-Level Art, using a relief nib, and had to use my right hand to get the thick and thin strokes to go the right way. My favourite style was developed by Graily Hewitt, plain and clear.

At college I could write faster and make fuller notes than anyone else, so I was popular if anyone missed lectures and wanted to borrow a summary!

I dutifully print on forms when asked to, but honestly, the result is not always as legible as my cursive!

I never did learn to use a typewriter, and not for lack of trying! Apparently I cannot coordinate both hands, and typing is a pain, even with autocorrect, spell checkers and every other trick in the book.

Handwriting is still a pleasure, and I love taking the time to write greeting cards and personal letters by hand wnehever I can.

No child should ever be deprived of the pleasure!
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Mailand  Identity Verified
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Italian to German
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Unfortunately things did change Sep 8, 2010

Ivan Patti wrote:

Madeleine MacRae Klintebo wrote:
BTW - what do they do in Italy? Almost all my Italian friends - 30-50 years - have very beautiful handwriting.


We were taught both cursive and printed handwriting, but cursive was the mostly used: pupils were not allowed to do their homework in printed handwriting and during class time you always had to write in cursive. This went on till the end of high school, and even written examinations at university had to be in cursive.

I don't know what's going on these days, but I don't think anything changed.

Ivan


Hello Madeleine and Ivan (and everyone joining in, of course!)

I have to children of school age and while the first one had to learn cursive, the second one (they have a little more than 2 years difference), did "somehow" start it, but during the five years of elementary school, it somehow just "faded away".
Those of us who live in Italy now what problems and changes the Italian school system is going through, I do not know if these changes brought about the change in attitude towards cursive, as well. I think it's a shame!


 

Soonthon LUPKITARO(Ph.D.)  Identity Verified
Thailand
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English to Thai
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Oxon English Sep 8, 2010

In Thailand, we started English with Oxford University books, and cursive writing was mandatory. Now I feel that the one who writes only printed English letters not a man, but a printing machine!

Soonthon Lupkitaro


 

Carole Paquis  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
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Member (2007)
English to French
joined up writing in the UK Sep 8, 2010

What they call 'joined up writing' in the UK is not what the French call "cursive".

My daughter is schooled in the UK and I taught her the French cursive.... the funny thing is that she was comparing notes with Polish children, who could also write in cursive, having learnt it in Poland... revolution was brewing in the classroom, until the teacher put a stop to it and ask them to go back to "joined up writing"...
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What they call 'joined up writing' in the UK is not what the French call "cursive".

My daughter is schooled in the UK and I taught her the French cursive.... the funny thing is that she was comparing notes with Polish children, who could also write in cursive, having learnt it in Poland... revolution was brewing in the classroom, until the teacher put a stop to it and ask them to go back to "joined up writing"...

She does write her French in cursive and her English in joined up writing.



Carole
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Carole Paquis  Identity Verified
United Kingdom
Local time: 20:28
Member (2007)
English to French
Exactly the kind of reply I got at home Sep 8, 2010

Neil Coffey wrote:

Great -- next time your son has to use a quill, that'll sure come in handy...



.... when I decided to teach my daughter the cursive.

Anyway, in my case, I did explain that if our daughter was ever to be schooled in France, one of the first clues to a child's academic development would be her handwriting.
To put it crudely, for the large majority of French teachers, a child who doesn't handle the cursive well is considered illiterate.... or at least needing special attention in the classroom.

PS: and there's no need to moan about the French educational system here... I know!

Carole


 

Katalin Horváth McClure  Identity Verified
United States
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I beg your pardon, Neil Sep 8, 2010

Neil Coffey wrote:
Great educational priorities...

Katalin Horvath McClure wrote:
At my son's school, they definitely teach cursive handwriting.


Great -- next time your son has to use a quill, that'll sure come in handy...


Neil,
How on earth did you draw a conclusion about educational priorities (either the school's or mine) from the statement that my son's school's curriculum includes cursive handwriting?

I simply asked Jeff where his one liner, saying "Schools in the U.S. are no longer teaching cursive or script handwriting" was coming from, as I know at least one counter-example first hand, and know many other schools in the area that teach cursive.

I have my own opinion on education in the US in general, and believe me, it is not very good, but I feel your generalizing comment about priorities is a very far leap in thinking and an unfair judgment on the school, and consequently, on me, as a parent, since I decided to send my son to that particular school (where I think the priorities are in good order, by the way).

Katalin


 

PCovs
Denmark
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English to Danish
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Phased out in Denmark, too Sep 8, 2010

Not too long ago I heard that cursive writing would no longer be taught in Denmark.

When I went to school from late 70s and onwards, we were taught cursive writing first, and then we were taught joined-up-writing, so we got to know both ways.

I think the sole problem here would be, that these children will find it extremely difficult to decipher a text written in cursive writing, whereas a large number of people will still be using it.


 

LegalTranslatr2  Identity Verified
United States
Local time: 14:28
Portuguese to English
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TOPIC STARTER
Cursive writing being tapered off Apr 8, 2013

http://goshennews.com/local/x1340808849/Instruction-of-cursive-writing-has-tapered-off-locally

 
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