LOVE TRANSLATING BUT WHAT ABOUT A CHANGE SOMETIMES?
Thread poster: Vincent Lemma

Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
May 8

Hello All,
Translating for me is definitely a great profession that has allowed me to achieve independence, by my own boss and work from mostly anywhere. Nevertheless, after quite a number of years at it sometimes I feel like a change would be interesting, at least to fight those symptoms of translator burnout, I suppose.

As a translator, we are always studying our fields of specialization to keep up to date and enhance our services, yet it feels like it's not enough. As a U.S
... See more
Hello All,
Translating for me is definitely a great profession that has allowed me to achieve independence, by my own boss and work from mostly anywhere. Nevertheless, after quite a number of years at it sometimes I feel like a change would be interesting, at least to fight those symptoms of translator burnout, I suppose.

As a translator, we are always studying our fields of specialization to keep up to date and enhance our services, yet it feels like it's not enough. As a U.S. citizen, I believe that it is in our culture to want to change careers, or at least try new things out.
I do have a few ideas rolling around in my head that I like to play with, but breaching the gap in one's confort zone after many years is definitely a challenge. Most likely, I would never jump ship fully but I would consider redirecting part of my energies and commitments.

Has anyone else ever felt like it was time to change something?

Have a great one
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Edgar Baradlai
 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Jumping ship May 8

Vincent Lemma wrote:

.....I would never jump ship fully ....Has anyone else ever felt like it was time to change something?



I actually jumped ship from my first profession (architect) to take up translating. I'm still an architect part of the time but now, I'm mainly a translator. I'm enjoying the change and have few regrets.


Kay-Viktor Stegemann
 

Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Translation is more rewarding ? May 8

Tom in London wrote:

Vincent Lemma wrote:

.....I would never jump ship fully ....Has anyone else ever felt like it was time to change something?



I actually jumped ship from my first profession (architect) to take up translating. I'm still an architect part of the time but now, I'm mainly a translator. I'm enjoying the change and have few regrets.


Do you feel that translation is more rewarding overall than being an architect?
I feel that there is only so much that one can do as a translator, but I assume that it might be the same for many careers.


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Overall May 8

Vincent Lemma wrote:

Do you feel that translation is more rewarding overall than being an architect?



The rewards come much faster and much more frequently. The translation I'm doing right now will be delivered in 2 days' time and will be put to use immediately. No bureaucratic/approval processes are involved; I don't need to go to meetings or negotiate with anyone (except the translation agencies); all of my translation jobs are put to use and paid for quickly; and I don't waste time on abortive projects that never go ahead. Above all, I'm out of the professional backstabbing environment.

There's also a lot less running around. There are just so many flights, trains, and taxis you can take before you burn out. Now I sit conveniently at home, working, with nobody to bother me (except for those pesky agencies, of course).

I still have a passion for architecture but I can be more detached about it.

Maybe you should become an architect

[Edited at 2019-05-08 15:14 GMT]


Vincent Lemma
 

Jo Macdonald  Identity Verified
Spain
Local time: 01:58
Member (2005)
Italian to English
+ ...
Give it a go May 8

Vincent Lemma wrote:

Most likely, I would never jump ship fully but I would consider redirecting part of my energies and commitments.

Has anyone else ever felt like it was time to change something?

Have a great one


Hi Vincent
I'd say give it a go without burning your bridges.
A few years ago when there was another lull in the translation business I started teaching kitesurfing/surfing again and it was great, very rewarding, open air, meet new people, make new friends, help people stay safe.
Of course there were both pros and cons with that job and when I started getting more translation work again I eventually stopped teaching and went back to just translating.
For a while I was pretty busy with both and it was getting a bit too much.


Vincent Lemma
 

Catriona Thomas
Local time: 01:58
German to English
A change sometimes - thinking out of the box May 8

A very interesting question. I've been a translator for over 25 years. I first translated on the side, while working as an editor at a legal journal. I then moved to a law firm and spent 10 years working as a fully fledged legal translator, before going freelance more than 10 years ago. Translating enables me to keep up my language skills in both my native tongue (English) and my acquired language (German). I enjoy working on legal texts, which are often intellectually challenging.

... See more
A very interesting question. I've been a translator for over 25 years. I first translated on the side, while working as an editor at a legal journal. I then moved to a law firm and spent 10 years working as a fully fledged legal translator, before going freelance more than 10 years ago. Translating enables me to keep up my language skills in both my native tongue (English) and my acquired language (German). I enjoy working on legal texts, which are often intellectually challenging.

In order to broaden my horizons somewhat I have branched out in the field of my hobby. I play a lot of golf and over the past four years have been gradually qualifying as a rules official. In the meantime I work as a referee at national tournaments and league games in Germany, preparing the course for, organizing and monitoring play during competitions. I have had to develop a completely new set of skills while also using my experience as a translator to revise for the relevant exams. I also have to make sure that a ruling decided on during a tournament is followed by the players. This work is done on an honorary basis but has definitely broadened my horizons, enriched my knowledge and capabilities, and led to new acquaintances. I also became involved in high-level discussions about the new Rules of Golf that were translated into the German language over the past 18 months. Unexpected developments maybe, but highly interesting and rewarding.
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Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Planes, trains and automobiles May 8

Tom in London wrote:

Vincent Lemma wrote:

Do you feel that translation is more rewarding overall than being an architect?



The rewards come much faster and much more frequently. The translation I'm doing right now will be delivered in 2 days' time and will be put to use immediately. No bureaucratic/approval processes are involved; I don't need to go to meetings or negotiate with anyone (except the translation agencies); all of my translation jobs are put to use and paid for quickly; and I don't waste time on abortive projects that never go ahead. Above all, I'm out of the professional backstabbing environment.

There's also a lot less running around. There are just so many flights, trains, and taxis you can take before you burn out. Now I sit conveniently at home, working, with nobody to bother me (except for those pesky agencies, of course).

I still have a passion for architecture but I can be more detached about it.

Maybe you should become an architect

[Edited at 2019-05-08 15:14 GMT]


I am actually a licensed electrician No, I do not wish to run around on planes, trains and automobiles (though John Candy was really cool).
All of your arguments are really solid and I appreciate the feedback.


 

Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Kitesurfing is certainly a change May 8

Jo Macdonald wrote:

Vincent Lemma wrote:

Most likely, I would never jump ship fully but I would consider redirecting part of my energies and commitments.

Has anyone else ever felt like it was time to change something?

Have a great one


Hi Vincent
I'd say give it a go without burning your bridges.
A few years ago when there was another lull in the translation business I started teaching kitesurfing/surfing again and it was great, very rewarding, open air, meet new people, make new friends, help people stay safe.
Of course there were both pros and cons with that job and when I started getting more translation work again I eventually stopped teaching and went back to just translating.
For a while I was pretty busy with both and it was getting a bit too much.


Teaching kitesurfing, now that is certainly interesting, indeed. My problem is not that the industry is in a slump, for me, but that it just seems to be the same old, same old. Sure, at times work slows down, but overall can't complain, except for the fact that agencies seem to be more demanding in terms of prices, i.e. they want price cuts without really seeing the value of our work.


Jo Macdonald
 

Liviu-Lee Roth
United States
Local time: 19:58
Romanian to English
+ ...
Welcome aboard! May 8

I am 67 and retired but I had a wonderful life with a lot of twists and career changes.
After graduating from law school I worked for three years as a detective and then, for 14 years as a prosecutor. Then, I escaped that communist country and started a new life in the USA. After a short stint as a factory worker, I became an ultrasound technician and worked for seven years in a large hospital. After that, I had my own used car dealership and got licensed as a real estate agent (which I d
... See more
I am 67 and retired but I had a wonderful life with a lot of twists and career changes.
After graduating from law school I worked for three years as a detective and then, for 14 years as a prosecutor. Then, I escaped that communist country and started a new life in the USA. After a short stint as a factory worker, I became an ultrasound technician and worked for seven years in a large hospital. After that, I had my own used car dealership and got licensed as a real estate agent (which I did not like- too much BS). Meanwhile, I started doing court interpreting and legal translation. In-between, I worked as a plumber, gardener, auto mechanic, painter and electrician. The problem is that I hate having bosses who lack the sense of humour and are not highly intelligent from whom I can learn something.
I consider myself blessed for not living a boring life.

It seems that I fit the "slasher" definition. Cool!

Good luck, and enjoy the change to the fullest.

Lee

[Edited at 2019-05-09 00:43 GMT]
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Edgar Baradlai
philgoddard
Michael Wetzel
 

Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Outside the box is the way to go to spice up life May 8

Catriona Thomas wrote:

A very interesting question. I've been a translator for over 25 years. I first translated on the side, while working as an editor at a legal journal. I then moved to a law firm and spent 10 years working as a fully fledged legal translator, before going freelance more than 10 years ago. Translating enables me to keep up my language skills in both my native tongue (English) and my acquired language (German). I enjoy working on legal texts, which are often intellectually challenging.

In order to broaden my horizons somewhat I have branched out in the field of my hobby. I play a lot of golf and over the past four years have been gradually qualifying as a rules official. In the meantime I work as a referee at national tournaments and league games in Germany, preparing the course for, organizing and monitoring play during competitions. I have had to develop a completely new set of skills while also using my experience as a translator to revise for the relevant exams. I also have to make sure that a ruling decided on during a tournament is followed by the players. This work is done on an honorary basis but has definitely broadened my horizons, enriched my knowledge and capabilities, and led to new acquaintances. I also became involved in high-level discussions about the new Rules of Golf that were translated into the German language over the past 18 months. Unexpected developments maybe, but highly interesting and rewarding.


I like the way you and other "colleagues" integrate different interests and skills to branch off into new ventures. Your example is definitely one worth keeping in mind.
I am bilingual and have lived half my life in the US and the other in Italy, aside from translating I am a licensed electrician, have been a ghost writer and speaker at the UN for Human Rights, radio show host, English teacher and shop owner.
I also run an animal charity in Italy, so I definitely have some experience in a few areas Maybe I can play around with these skills and make something interesting


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Slashers May 8

This is an interesting discussion; it reveals that many of us are portfolio workers with many irons in the fire.

"What is a 'slasher' and could it be the modern career answer to job insecurity?"

https://www.theguardian.com/careers/careers-blog/graduate-job-seeking-the-rise-of-the-slasher


 

Vincent Lemma  Identity Verified
Italy
Local time: 01:58
Member (2008)
Italian to English
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Never heard about "slashers" before unless it was in a Friday the 13th movie May 8

But yes, I suppose that is what many of us are. I personally did not attend translator school All of my experience and growth is hands on and comes from independent study, technical college and university in electronics engineering, experience in-house with engineering firms, business owner, in-field PR, self-taught writer...etc.
So, I do feel that many translators have other skills that can be exploited and, in my opinion,
... See more
But yes, I suppose that is what many of us are. I personally did not attend translator school All of my experience and growth is hands on and comes from independent study, technical college and university in electronics engineering, experience in-house with engineering firms, business owner, in-field PR, self-taught writer...etc.
So, I do feel that many translators have other skills that can be exploited and, in my opinion, translators excel the most in fields where they have applied knowledge.

Guess, I'll rip out my Friday the 13th mask and become a slasher
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LOVE TRANSLATING BUT WHAT ABOUT A CHANGE SOMETIMES?

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